The ABCs of Carburetion

UM-900 (1959)

 

Page 9 of 19

SIMPLIFIED PRINCIPLES OF CARBURETION
BASIC IDEAS
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Pressure is the factor which does all the heavy work in carburetion. "Vacuum" is simply a term for a pressure lower than the atmosphere. Any fluid will tend to flow from a higher pres­sure to a lower pressure. (Consider a garden hose, with city water pressure on one end and atmospheric on the other end.) The amount and speed of flow depends on the size of the pressure difference (more water will flow faster at 80 lb. pressure than at 60 lb. pressure).
In the case of the carburetor, atmospheric pressure is the "higher pressure" which "pushes" air and fuel toward the "vacuum" or "lower pressure" in the venturi and manifold.
It may be said that the piston moving down­ward on the intake stroke "draws" air and fuel into the cylinder, but strictly speaking it is simply lowering the pressure to allow atmos­pheric pressure to "push" air and fuel into the cylinder.
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