The ABCs of Carburetion

UM-900 (1959)

 

Page 3 of 19

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THE CARBURETOR'S JOB
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WHY A CARBURETOR?
As a liquid, gasoline is of little or no use to an engine. Its energy can be released only by combustion, or burning; in order to burn properly it must be in vapor form, properly mixed with air, and delivered to the cylinder of the engine as a combustible mixture, where it is first compressed and then ignited by the spark plug.
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WHAT MUST THE CARBURETOR DO?
It is the carburetor's responsibility to meter, atomize, and distribute the gasoline through­out the air being drawn into the engine. It must do these things properly through a wide range of speed, load, and temperature, in answer to the demands of the driver, who con­trols the amount of fuel flow by his use of the accelerator.
Since the modern carburetor must do all its duties automatically with changes in condi­tions, it is bound to be an intricate device and appears very complicated. However, when re­duced to basic functions and studied one step at a time, carburetion is more easily understood.
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